Odin & valkyries

odin & valkyries

Valkyries of Odin Online auf ☆ StarGames spielen! ✚ Stars Casino Bonus ✓ Original Novoslots ✚ Gratis spielen ➜ JETZT spielen!. Versuch dein Glück und gewinne echtes Bargeld mit Valkyries Of Odin und vielen anderen casino-Spielen oder spiele kostenlos! Melde dich an und schnapp dir. Eine Walküre (Aussprache: [valˈkyːrə], auch [ ˈvalkyːrə]), auch Schlacht- oder Schildjungfer, ist in der nordischen Mythologie ein weibliches Geistwesen aus dem Gefolge des Göttervaters Odin (Wodan).

According to this legend, a "small people" known as the Winnili were ruled by a woman named Gambara who had two sons, Ybor and Aio.

The Vandals , ruled by Ambri and Assi , came to the Winnili with their army and demanded that they pay them tribute or prepare for war. Ybor, Aio, and their mother Gambara rejected their demands for tribute.

Ambri and Assi then asked the god Godan for victory over the Winnili, to which Godan responded in the longer version in the Origo: Frea counselled them that "at sunrise the Winnil[i] should come, and that their women, with their hair let down around the face in the likeness of a beard should also come with their husbands".

Godan saw the Winnili, including their whiskered women, and asked "who are those Long-beards? Godan did so, "so that they should defend themselves according to his counsel and obtain the victory".

Writing in the mid-7th century, Jonas of Bobbio wrote that earlier that century the Irish missionary Columbanus disrupted an offering of beer to Odin vodano " whom others called Mercury " in Swabia.

A 10th-century manuscript found in Merseburg , Germany, features a heathen invocation known as the Second Merseburg Incantation , which calls upon Odin and other gods and goddesses from the continental Germanic pantheon to assist in healing a horse:.

Phol ende uuodan uuoran zi holza. Phol and Woden travelled to the forest. Then encharmed it Sindgund and Sunna her sister, then encharmed it Frija and Volla her sister, then encharmed it Woden , as he the best could, As the bone-wrench, so for the blood wrench, and so the limb-wrench bone to bone, blood to blood, limb to limb, so be glued.

In the 11th century, chronicler Adam of Bremen recorded in a scholion of his Gesta Hammaburgensis Ecclesiae Pontificum that a statue of Thor, whom Adam describes as "mightiest", sat enthroned in the Temple at Uppsala located in Gamla Uppsala, Sweden flanked by Wodan Odin and " Fricco ".

Regarding Odin, Adam defines him as "frenzy" Wodan, id est furor and says that he "rules war and gives people strength against the enemy" and that the people of the temple depict him as wearing armour, "as our people depict Mars".

In the 12th century, centuries after Norway was "officially" Christianised, Odin was still being invoked by the population, as evidenced by a stick bearing a runic message found among the Bryggen inscriptions in Bergen, Norway.

On the stick, both Thor and Odin are called upon for help; Thor is asked to "receive" the reader, and Odin to "own" them. Odin is mentioned or appears in most poems of the Poetic Edda , compiled in the 13th century from traditional source material reaching back to the pagan period.

The meaning of these gifts has been a matter of scholarly disagreement and translations therefore vary. During this, the first war of the world, Odin flung his spear into the opposing forces of the Vanir.

On the mountain Sigurd sees a great light, "as if fire were burning, which blazed up to the sky". Sigurd approaches it, and there he sees a skjaldborg a tactical formation of shield wall with a banner flying overhead.

Sigurd enters the skjaldborg , and sees a warrior lying there—asleep and fully armed. Sigurd removes the helmet of the warrior, and sees the face of a woman.

Sigurd uses his sword Gram to cut the corslet, starting from the neck of the corslet downwards, he continues cutting down her sleeves, and takes the corslet off her.

The woman wakes, sits up, looks at Sigurd , and the two converse in two stanzas of verse. In the second stanza, the woman explains that Odin placed a sleeping spell on her which she could not break, and due to that spell she has been asleep a long time.

Sigurd asks for her name, and the woman gives Sigurd a horn of mead to help him retain her words in his memory. The woman recites a heathen prayer in two stanzas.

Odin had promised one of these— Hjalmgunnar —victory in battle, yet she had "brought down" Hjalmgunnar in battle. Odin pricked her with a sleeping-thorn in consequence, told her that she would never again "fight victoriously in battle", and condemned her to marriage.

Odin is mentioned throughout the books of the Prose Edda , authored by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century and drawing from earlier traditional material.

The ravens tell Odin everything they see and hear. Odin sends Huginn and Muninn out at dawn, and the birds fly all over the world before returning at dinner-time.

As a result, Odin is kept informed of many events. High adds that it is from this association that Odin is referred to as "raven-god".

In the same chapter, the enthroned figure of High explains that Odin gives all of the food on his table to his wolves Geri and Freki and that Odin requires no food, for wine is to him both meat and drink.

Odin is mentioned several times in the sagas that make up Heimskringla. In the Ynglinga saga , the first section of Heimskringla , an euhemerised account of the origin of the gods is provided.

It was the custom there that twelve temple priests were ranked highest; they administered sacrifices and held judgements over men. Odin was a very successful warrior and travelled widely, conquering many lands.

Odin was so successful that he never lost a battle. As a result, according to the saga, men came to believe that "it was granted to him" to win all battles.

The men placed all of their faith in Odin, and wherever they called his name they would receive assistance from doing so.

Odin was often gone for great spans of time. While Odin was gone, his brothers governed his realm. However, afterwards, [Odin] returned and took possession of his wife again".

According to the chapter, Odin "made war on the Vanir ". As part of a peace agreement, the two sides exchanged hostages. Local folklore and folk practice recognised Odin as late as the 19th century in Scandinavia.

In a work published in the midth century, Benjamin Thorpe records that on Gotland , "many traditions and stories of Odin the Old still live in the mouths of the people".

Local legend dictates that after it was opened, "there burst forth a wondrous fire, like a flash of lightning", and that a coffin full of flint and a lamp were excavated.

Thorpe additionally relates that legend has it that a priest who dwelt around Troienborg had once sowed some rye, and that when the rye sprang up, so came Odin riding from the hills each evening.

Odin was so massive that he towered over the farm-yard buildings, spear in hand. Halting before the entry way, he kept all from entering or leaving all night, which occurred every night until the rye was cut.

Thorpe notes that numerous other traditions existed in Sweden at the time of his writing. Thorpe records that in Sweden, "when a noise, like that of carriages and horses, is heard by night, the people say: References to or depictions of Odin appear on numerous objects.

Migration Period 5th and 6th century CE gold bracteates types A, B, and C feature a depiction of a human figure above a horse, holding a spear and flanked by one or more often two birds.

The presence of the birds has led to the iconographic identification of the human figure as the god Odin, flanked by Huginn and Muninn.

Bracteates have been found in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and, in smaller numbers, England and areas south of Denmark. Vendel Period helmet plates from the 6th or 7th century found in a grave in Sweden depict a helmeted figure holding a spear and a shield while riding a horse, flanked by two birds.

The plate has been interpreted as Odin accompanied by two birds; his ravens. Two of the 8th century picture stones from the island of Gotland, Sweden depict eight-legged horses, which are thought by most scholars to depict Sleipnir: Both stones feature a rider sitting atop an eight-legged horse, which some scholars view as Odin.

The scene has been interpreted as a rider arriving at the world of the dead. The back of each bird features a mask-motif, and the feet of the birds are shaped like the heads of animals.

Valhalla is depicted as a splendid palace, roofed with shields, where the warriors feast on the flesh of a boar slaughtered daily and made whole again each….

Germanic religion and mythology, complex of stories, lore, and beliefs about the gods and the nature of the cosmos developed by the Germanic-speaking peoples before their conversion to Christianity.

Germanic culture extended, at various times, from the Black Sea to Greenland, or even the North…. Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students.

Help us improve this article! Contact our editors with your feedback. You may find it helpful to search within the site to see how similar or related subjects are covered.

Any text you add should be original, not copied from other sources. At the bottom of the article, feel free to list any sources that support your changes, so that we can fully understand their context.

Internet URLs are the best. Thank You for Your Contribution! You may want to save them for late or post-game play, especially as completing the main story unlocks the locations of all eight Valkyries on your map.

Even still, there are certain general tactics you should apply to each of your fights, which could help edge the battle in your favor.

The eight Valkyries all range in how tough they are due to arena size, arsenal, and just general strength. Play to your strengths for the first Valkyrie fight.

Because Gunnr is the easiest of the bunch, you can find what works best for you while getting a taste of what these unique fights are like.

Prefer a defensive Kratos? The Reaml Shift talisman is a solid option. Gunnr has many attacks at her disposal, but most of them can be blocked if you learn the pattern.

Her main attacks will either include swiping with her bladed wings, or summong a scythe for a lunging attack. She can also do this after slicing with her wings - or she can end the wing slice combo with an unblockable wing jab from her right wing.

As long as you keep Atreus busy peppering the Valkyrie with arrows and capitalize on the moments she gets stunned, and stay alert to parry staggering attacks, you can bring her health down over time.

Discovered in the River Pass. Kara can summon additional level 4 Draugr for Kratos to deal with, which are more of a pain and distraction than a challenge, especially as the fight drags on and Shield, Speed, and Ranged Draugr starts getting thrown in.

Deal with the Draugr in bulk, using runic AOE attacks to make quick work of them so you can continue focusing on Kara, and the Blades of Chaos, even if they do less damage, can ensure all targets get hit and taken out.

She can however lift into the air and either toss several magical circle blades at you that angle - making it a wiser choice to block than dodge - or she can prepare an unblockable fast circle that flies straight, but you can dodge to the side.

Wait for her to come to you and be ready to block and parry any and all incoming attacks, and redirect them at the Valkyrie if you can.

Discovered in the Foothills. This Valkyrie employs a varied amount of attacks taking some cues from both Kara and Gunnr, but puts her own spin on things by rapidly darting around to changeup attacks.

She may also hold out her scythe and prepare an unblockable force wave - if you see it coming get ready to dodge to the side. Her most fearsome abilities come from the air with two different attack methods.

She also has an unblockable grab, if you see her take to the air and start spinning in a loop, get ready to dodge to the side, then capitalize on her as he misses and grinds to a halt.

Since she likes to move back and forth a lot, it can be hard to get her to stay still for attacks. Have Atreus keep peppering her with Shock Arrows but always leave one open to shut down her blinding attack.

Her most fearsome abilities come from the air with two different attack methods. She also has an unblockable grab, if you see her take to the air and start spinning in a loop, get ready to dodge to the side, then capitalize on her as he misses and grinds to a halt.

Since she likes to move back and forth a lot, it can be hard to get her to stay still for attacks. Have Atreus keep peppering her with Shock Arrows but always leave one open to shut down her blinding attack.

Stunning Runic Summons can also slow her down long enough for you to get a good string of combos in. Talismans that activate Realm Shift are also extremely useful in this situation.

Discovered in the Realm of Alfheim. Olrun is a fast fighter, and you may need to keep up with her quick attacks with light attacks of your own - as long slow attacks from either weapons may leave you open to her fast sweeps and lunges.

Olrun will go between rushing up to either perform an unblockable jab from her right wing, perform several wing slashes, or use a spinning wing attack up close that can lethal if not blocked.

The big thing to remember when facing Olrun is to always move to your right and be ready to dodge in the same direction in order to avoid her dashing red stab.

Just remember to block her wing swing attack, then be ready to dodge to the right to avoid the unblockable follow up stab. Discovered in the Heart of the Mountain, located between the minecarft lift and the secondary lift you find upon your return to the Mountain, behind a Hidden Chamber of Odin.

Break this guard with either a Runic Attack, or a double tap of L1. When she dashes towards you with her giant mace, be prepared to roll backwards from her to avoid her explosion, then be ready to dodge again to avoid her follow up attack.

When she flies into the air and twirls her weapon, immediately have Atreus shoot her with an arrow to interrupt her unblockable explosion that will sometimes kill you outright.

The most important thing to remember against Eir is that you never want to corner yourself. Always have room to evade either to the sides or behind.

All it takes is one or two mistakes for her to gain the upper hand. Discovered in the Realm of Muspelheim, found at the very top of the mountain after completing all previous trial challenges.

Gondul has some twists on the usual Valkyrie tricks. She also has a unique ability that calls down three fireballs in a straight line that leave persistent area of effect damage on the ground.

Having Enchantments that lower fire damage can help keep you alive in the long run. Gondul will employ other familiar Valkyrie tactics - firing wing projectiles, using her wings to slice at you before either following up with an unblockable stab from her right side - or a spinning attack.

This theory is not universally accepted, and the reference has also been theorised as a simple metaphor for the "victorious sword" the stinging of the bees.

Once the Idisi sat, sat here and there, some bound fetters, some hampered the army, some untied fetters: Escape from the fetters, flee from the enemies.

The Idisi mentioned in the incantation are generally considered to be valkyries. In addition, the place name Idisiaviso meaning "plain of the Idisi" where forces commanded by Arminius fought those commanded by Germanicus at the Battle of the Weser River in 16 AD.

Simek points to a connection between the name Idisiaviso , the role of the Idisi in one of the two Merseburg Incantations and valkyries.

Jacob Grimm states that, though the norns and valkyries are similar in nature, there is a fundamental difference between the two.

The norns have to pronounce the fatum [fate], they sit on their chairs, or they roam through the country among mortals, fastening their threads.

Nowhere is it said that they ride. The valkyrs ride to war, decide the issues of fighting, and conduct the fallen to heaven; their riding is like that of heroes and gods".

Various theories have been proposed about the origins and development of the valkyries from Germanic paganism to later Norse mythology.

Simek says that this original concept was "superseded by the shield girls —Irish female warriors who lived on like the einherjar in Valhall.

Simek states that due to the shift of concept, the valkyries became popular figures in heroic poetry , and during this transition were stripped of their "demonic characteristics and became more human, and therefore become capable of falling in love with mortals [ MacLeod and Mees theorise that "the role of the corpse-choosing valkyries became increasingly confused in later Norse mythology with that of the Norns , the supernatural females responsible for determining human destiny [ Hilda Ellis Davidson says that, regarding valkyries, "evidently an elaborate literary picture has been built up by generations of poets and storytellers, in which several conceptions can be discerned.

We recognise something akin to Norns, spirits who decide destinies of men; to the seeresses , who could protect men in battle with their spells; to the powerful female guardian spirits attached to certain families, bringing luck to youth under their protection; even to certain women who armed themselves and fought like men, for whom there is some historical evidence from the regions round the Black Sea ".

She adds that there may also be a memory in this of a "priestess of the god of war, women who officiated at the sacrificial rites when captives were put to death after battle.

Davidson places emphasis on the fact that valkyrie literally means "chooser of the slain". Davidson says that "it would hardly be surprising if strange legends grew up about such women, who must have been kept apart from their kind due to their gruesome duties.

Since it was often decided by lot which prisoners should be killed, the idea that the god "chose" his victims, through the instrument of the priestesses, must have been a familiar one, apart from the obvious assumption that some were chosen to fall in war.

Valkyries have been the subjects of various poems, works of art and musical works. Becker reproduced in with the same title by A. Leeke, Einherier painting, from around , by K.

Dielitz, The Ride of the Valkyries painting, from around by J. Kolb, and Valkyrier drawing, by E. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For other uses, see Valkyrie disambiguation. List of valkyrie names. Valkyrie name etymologies from Orchard For Hariasa, Simek Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions.

Gods and Myths of Northern Europe. Viking Age functional culture as a reflection of the belief in divine intervention " in Andren, A.

Fagrskinna, a Catalogue of the Kings of Norway: A Translation with Introduction and Notes. New York University Press. George Bell and Sons.

Elves in Anglo-Saxon England. History of the Kings of Norway. University of Texas Press. Runic Amulets and Magic Objects.

Comparative Studies in History of Religions: Their Aim, Scrope and Validity. Heathen Gods in Old English Literature. Dictionary of Norse Myth and Legend.

A Handbook of Germanic Etymology. Dictionary of Northern Mythology. Upplands runinskrifter del 4. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien. The woman recites a heathen prayer in two stanzas.

Odin had promised one of these— Hjalmgunnar —victory in battle, yet she had "brought down" Hjalmgunnar in battle. Odin pricked her with a sleeping-thorn in consequence, told her that she would never again "fight victoriously in battle", and condemned her to marriage.

Odin is mentioned throughout the books of the Prose Edda , authored by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century and drawing from earlier traditional material.

The ravens tell Odin everything they see and hear. Odin sends Huginn and Muninn out at dawn, and the birds fly all over the world before returning at dinner-time.

As a result, Odin is kept informed of many events. High adds that it is from this association that Odin is referred to as "raven-god".

In the same chapter, the enthroned figure of High explains that Odin gives all of the food on his table to his wolves Geri and Freki and that Odin requires no food, for wine is to him both meat and drink.

Odin is mentioned several times in the sagas that make up Heimskringla. In the Ynglinga saga , the first section of Heimskringla , an euhemerised account of the origin of the gods is provided.

It was the custom there that twelve temple priests were ranked highest; they administered sacrifices and held judgements over men.

Odin was a very successful warrior and travelled widely, conquering many lands. Odin was so successful that he never lost a battle. As a result, according to the saga, men came to believe that "it was granted to him" to win all battles.

The men placed all of their faith in Odin, and wherever they called his name they would receive assistance from doing so. Odin was often gone for great spans of time.

While Odin was gone, his brothers governed his realm. However, afterwards, [Odin] returned and took possession of his wife again".

According to the chapter, Odin "made war on the Vanir ". As part of a peace agreement, the two sides exchanged hostages.

Local folklore and folk practice recognised Odin as late as the 19th century in Scandinavia. In a work published in the midth century, Benjamin Thorpe records that on Gotland , "many traditions and stories of Odin the Old still live in the mouths of the people".

Local legend dictates that after it was opened, "there burst forth a wondrous fire, like a flash of lightning", and that a coffin full of flint and a lamp were excavated.

Thorpe additionally relates that legend has it that a priest who dwelt around Troienborg had once sowed some rye, and that when the rye sprang up, so came Odin riding from the hills each evening.

Odin was so massive that he towered over the farm-yard buildings, spear in hand. Halting before the entry way, he kept all from entering or leaving all night, which occurred every night until the rye was cut.

Thorpe notes that numerous other traditions existed in Sweden at the time of his writing. Thorpe records that in Sweden, "when a noise, like that of carriages and horses, is heard by night, the people say: References to or depictions of Odin appear on numerous objects.

Migration Period 5th and 6th century CE gold bracteates types A, B, and C feature a depiction of a human figure above a horse, holding a spear and flanked by one or more often two birds.

The presence of the birds has led to the iconographic identification of the human figure as the god Odin, flanked by Huginn and Muninn.

Bracteates have been found in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and, in smaller numbers, England and areas south of Denmark.

Vendel Period helmet plates from the 6th or 7th century found in a grave in Sweden depict a helmeted figure holding a spear and a shield while riding a horse, flanked by two birds.

The plate has been interpreted as Odin accompanied by two birds; his ravens. Two of the 8th century picture stones from the island of Gotland, Sweden depict eight-legged horses, which are thought by most scholars to depict Sleipnir: Both stones feature a rider sitting atop an eight-legged horse, which some scholars view as Odin.

The scene has been interpreted as a rider arriving at the world of the dead. The back of each bird features a mask-motif, and the feet of the birds are shaped like the heads of animals.

The feathers of the birds are also composed of animal-heads. Together, the animal-heads on the feathers form a mask on the back of the bird. The birds have powerful beaks and fan-shaped tails, indicating that they are ravens.

The brooches were intended to be worn on each shoulder, after Germanic Iron Age fashion. The Oseberg tapestry fragments , discovered within the Viking Age Oseberg ship burial in Norway, features a scene containing two black birds hovering over a horse, possibly originally leading a wagon as a part of a procession of horse-led wagons on the tapestry.

In her examination of the tapestry, scholar Anne Stine Ingstad interprets these birds as Huginn and Muninn flying over a covered cart containing an image of Odin, drawing comparison to the images of Nerthus attested by Tacitus in 1 CE.

These objects depict a moustached man wearing a helmet that features two head-ornaments. Archaeologist Stig Jensen proposes these head-ornaments should be interpreted as Huginn and Muninn, and the wearer as Odin.

He notes that "similar depictions occur everywhere the Vikings went—from eastern England to Russia and naturally also in the rest of Scandinavia.

In November , the Roskilde Museum announced the discovery and subsequent display of a niello -inlaid silver figurine found in Lejre , which they dubbed Odin from Lejre.

The silver object depicts a person sitting on a throne. The throne features the heads of animals and is flanked by two birds.

Various interpretations have been offered for a symbol that appears on various archaeological finds known modernly as the valknut.

Due to the context of its placement on some objects, some scholars have interpreted this symbol as referring to Odin.

For example, Hilda Ellis Davidson theorises a connection between the valknut , the god Odin and "mental binds":. For instance, beside the figure of Odin on his horse shown on several memorial stones there is a kind of knot depicted, called the valknut , related to the triskele.

This is thought to symbolize the power of the god to bind and unbind, mentioned in the poems and elsewhere. Odin had the power to lay bonds upon the mind, so that men became helpless in battle, and he could also loosen the tensions of fear and strain by his gifts of battle-madness, intoxication, and inspiration.

Davidson says that similar symbols are found beside figures of wolves and ravens on "certain cremation urns" from Anglo-Saxon cemeteries in East Anglia.

Salin proposed that both Odin and the runes were introduced from Southeastern Europe in the Iron Age. Other scholars placed his introduction at different times; Axel Olrik , during the Migration Age as a result of Gaulish influence.

This was based on an embellished list of rulers invented by Johannes Magnus and adopted as fact in the reign of King Carl IX , who, though numbered accordingly, actually was only Carl III.

Another approach to Odin has been in terms of his function and attributes. Many early scholars interpreted him as a wind-god or especially as a death-god.

Odin is often mentioned as one of the early inspirations for modern European and US Christmas traditions see Santa Claus. The god Odin has been a source of inspiration for artists working in fine art, literature, and music.

Ehrenberg , the marble statue Wodan around by H.

Odin & valkyries - think

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